The League of Augsburg

Anniversary Post: Bloody Aughrim - Remembered as a wargame

Jacobite cavarly attack!

The Battle of Aughrim holds a strangely Cinderella like quality when compared with the Battle of the Boyne but in everyway it is more interesting. It was more evenly matched. more brutal and more decisive.
A game I organized at Derby a few years back (terrain by Adrian Howe)




It occurred almost a year later and by that time, despite their myriad tribulations, the Irish army...

Great choice for a wargaming force - The Enniskilleners

Enniskillen companies forward!


It is an ongoing personal mission to make available as much information as possible about the fighting men participating on both sides during the war in Ireland 1688-1691.


Enniskillen infantry in action against Jacobite chevaliers!


Over many years of digging, I have read, compared, sifted, interpreted, dismissed and compiled little bits and pieces of information in an...

Marlborough's amphibious campaign 1690 - pdf release



It is with delight and some pride that we release our latest pdf detailing the campaigns in Ireland between 1688 and 1691.

Charles Fort, Kinsale - scene of a bloody siege, sallies and assaults


This one deals with the ambitious and extremely successful amphibious campaign undertaken by the Earl of Marlborough against Cork and Kinsale in the autumn of 1690. Involving thousands of troops fresh from...

Naval campaign game 5: All hands to the oars!

Darkness and fog - ideal for an escape bid from a potentially hostile harbour

November 23rd, 1688: Copenhagen

Chaos reigns supreme in England. The invasion by Willem of Orange less than three weeks previously has caused the army to disintegrate. The naval service is in turmoil, torn between loyalty to its old commander in chief and King, the officers and men weigh the options for their individual...

The National Museum of Ireland - a lovely wee surprise

The parade ground square at Collins Barracks which is an old British Army facility from the late 18th/early 19th century.

I squeezed this in whilst speaking at a conference in Dublin. What a wonderful find it was. In this first post I thought I would trail the variety of fantastic and interesting militaria contained in a very substantial and well laid out national museum. I visited the Collins...

Marlborough's Danes




Yes, I know. How could Warfare have produced such an important component of the armies of the period without me getting my act together and at least letting everyone see what they look like in battalions?
An unforgivable omission but as always I will trot out my 'one man team' excuse. Well, that and Ottomans, Wagonburgs, wee ships, Cossacks and the like.




Anyway at last I have some units of Danes to...

Against the wind - Bantry Bay May 11, 1689

This second scenario using my 1/2400 ships is based on the events of May 11, 1689 when Admiral Herbert's English fleet attacked a French fleet under Admiral Chateaurenault in Bantry Bay on the south west coast of Ireland. It also gets me back to Ireland and my favourite theatre of the entire period.

The historical action was inconclusive and involved 24 French and 19 English vessels. Most were 3rd,...

Blood & Cutts! Part 2

The second part of my piece on Lord John Cutts of Gowran.

An appraisal of England’s fire eating general


English hero - for sure, Subject of Swiftian satire - definitely!

What he did best

His speciality was leading assaults into the breach. Many of his wounds were received in such situations. He seemed to gravitate towards peers and superiors with a similar disposition to his own. One such, Thomas...

Blood & Cutts! Part 1


This article appeared in issue #379 May 2019 or Wargames Illustrated. I am publishing it on the blog in three parts as it is fairly long.

An appraisal of England’s fire eating general 



   
John Cutts painted by Wissing around 1687, aged about 24
Who?
Like many notable men of his era, John Cutts is difficult to define in terms of good or bad, wrong or right. If considered only by his military deeds it...

The Walls of Limerick, Part III


Clarence Harrison- I've made some progress on my project for the Guns of August show this summer. It is August 24th-26th and I am definitely attending, though I will only be there Saturday and Sunday. The plan is to run the game twice on Saturday and once on Sunday. I have more detail to do on the walls of Limerick, but some of that will be easier do once the models are attached to the tiles....

The Walls of Limerick, Part II

Clarence Harrison - A little bit of math, lots of carving, and possibly some harsh words later...

The initial step, and the most important to get right, was to layout the front wall. This is where most of the harsh words came in. All of the angles had to meet up with each other and line up with the edges of the boards.


The walls were detailed by carving scattered stones with a scalple and then going...

The Walls of Limerick, Part I

Clarence Harrison - Every so often I get the urge to launch some sort of stupid large project. Ever since my partner's series on the Walls of Derry, I've wanted to do something similar. My trip to Derrylast year reinforced the desire. Finally, I'm planning to run some games at a small local show if my schedule works out - The Guns of August in Newport News, Virginia. Rather than just set up...